Tag Archives: Objects

Smalltalk a world of living Objects

When I first discovered Smalltalk, it took me a while to get my head around the fact that in image based Smalltalk systems, source code is not written in flat files. Source code in files was so ingrained into my thinking, I had to unlearn and leave a lot of assumptions I have made. In most programming languages programs are written and defined using text files, typically source code is written in text files, using a text editor or an IDE such as Eclipse, IntelliJ or Visual Studio. At this point it just “dead code” in text files, there are no running objects, this is often referred to as compile time. Before a program runs, the runtime environment is created, the program’s source code is parsed, compiled and executed, and when the program finishes the runtime environment is destroyed, so in essence every time a change is made to source code the entire program is created from scratch. Smalltalk is pure object oriented and everything is an object and everything is achieved by sending messages to objects. In Smalltalk we dont use source code in text files to define programs (classes methods etc) instead objects are used to define Smalltalk programs, objects themselves are used to define new classes method etc. Now an object can exist only at runtime, and in Smalltalk everything happens on the fly, there is no such thing as compile time, Smalltalk is a runtime, it is not just a programming language, its a living system, it is a world of “living objects”. This requires a paradigm shift and it often is one of the biggest barriers I find people face when entering into the Smalltalk world. Smalltalk pushes “Object thinking” to another level, but once you push past that barrier you enjoy all the benefits of working with living objects, you can interact with objects, inspect them modify, extended and change them on the fly. This is the main reason why Smalltalk environment have such powerful IDE’s.

So what happens when the smalltalk VM is shut down or not running ? Do the objects then die ?

No. The objects are in a suspended state or go into hibernation and are stored in an image. This is analogous to a VMware image, when you close a vmware image the operating system goes into a suspended state, so the next time the vmware image is loaded to exactly the same state it was before. In Smalltalk objects essentially never die (note objects without any references will be garbage collected), they simply go into a suspended state in the image, in a Squeak Smalltalk image it is very likely some objects are probably 30 years old !

In Smalltalk everything is an object, classes are first class object too, so they can respond to messages just like any other object, so it trivial to create new classes on the fly. The image based system of the Smalltalk might be a stumbling block for people entering into the Smalltalk world but I think this is one of the main things that gives Smalltalk its power, its awesome IDE and the ability to work with live objects makes development so much more productive.

So Smalltalk code doesnt live in files so what happens to version control systems then ?

I do most of my Smalltalk development in Squeak and I use Monticello as the versioning system, in Smalltalk source code itself are represented as objects and are basically modelled as a collection of packages, classes, and methods. Code changes then simply become addition/removal or update of these elements. Since the entire source code are modelled in objects, Smalltalk version control systems have very powerful merge and diff algorithms. The version control systems are language aware and source code changes and history can be tracked down to individual method.

Smalltalk is an amazingly powerful environment, developing in a Smalltalk made me see what incremental development is really about. I guess with GemStone now working on a Ruby VM which is primarily based on the GemStone/S Smalltalk VM, folks from the Ruby world can also experience developing with living objects

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